Suramya's Blog : Welcome to my crazy life…

April 20, 2014

Facebook Stat generation followup

Filed under: Computer Tips,Linux/Unix Related,My Thoughts,Techie Stuff — Suramya @ 2:16 AM

In my previous post I had talked about some of the stats I pulled from Facebook about it’s usage by my friends. This was an ad-hoc number crunching done just because I was bored and got curious. After the post went live a friend of mine, Ankush asked for more details on how I generated the numbers so in this post I am going to go over my process and how I got the numbers I shared.

Before we start, keep in mind that this is all data that is publicly available on FB, or at least shared with me. If you don’t want others to generate data about your activity on FB, you should change your privacy settings on FB and restrict access. Please don’t try to use this information to try to get access to data you are not supposed to. You will get in trouble and I will not take responsibility for it. Now that all that is out of the way, lets get to the details of the process.

The first thing you need is to have the Facebook Command Line client installed. Instructions on how to install are here so I am not going to repost them here. Make sure you authenticate the install and follow the steps in ‘Obtain Additional Authorization’ section of the installation guide otherwise the rest of the guide won’t be of much use to you.

Once you have FBCMD installed and configured, you can start playing with the options. Check out fbcmd Commands for the list of available options. You can also run the script with –help for the same.

/usr/bin/php /var/www/fbcmd/lib/fbcmd/fbcmd.php --help

Since I was interested in the photos uploaded the first command I ran was:

/usr/bin/php /var/www/fbcmd/lib/fbcmd/fbcmd.php OPICS =all FB_Pics

This command gets all the photos uploaded by folks in my friend list and downloaded them to the FB_Pics folder. As I mentioned in the previous post, this downloaded over 58k photos to my system. So be careful when you run it. You can also restrict it to a particular user by passing their name as a parameter.

To get the wall post count’s of all my friends, I ran the following command:

/usr/bin/php /var/www/fbcmd/lib/fbcmd/fbcmd.php FINFO wall_count =all

This gave me a output similar to the following:


NAME WALL_COUNT
Suramya Tomar 247
ABC 1405

I took this output, put it in an Excel file and did some analysis on it to get the max post count, least post count, Total count and top 10 user post counts. I could have done this using shell commands as well, but since this was a one time task I didn’t see the point. Maybe in the future I could set up a job that would do this periodically and do trending on the data but lets see. I don’t see much use for this data except for the coolness factor and to satisfy my curiosity.

Getting the birthday count was as easy as running the following command:

/usr/bin/php /var/www/fbcmd/lib/fbcmd/fbcmd.php FINFO birthday_date =all |wc -l

This returned the number of folks who had shared their birthday’s on FB and then I got the current location count using the following command:

/usr/bin/php /var/www/fbcmd/lib/fbcmd/fbcmd.php FINFO current_location =all |wc -l

So there you have it. This is how I generated the numbers I had posted earlier. As you can see there is nothing too complicated about it, so if you want you can generate similar stats for your friends as well.

Let me know if you have any questions and I will do my best to answer.

Well this is all for now. I should go and get some sleep now.

– Suramya

July 24, 2013

My RaspberryPi Camera module finally arrived and it works great!

Filed under: Computer Hardware,Linux/Unix Related,My Thoughts,Techie Stuff — Suramya @ 2:06 AM

After months of waiting (about 2 to be exact) my RaspberryPi Camera module finally arrived today and I took it for a brief spin. Setting it up was really easy, I just installed the Rasbian image I have, updated the install to the latest version and then enabled the camera. Once that was done and I rebooted the Pi, the camera started working without any issues. The instructions I followed are at: RaspberryPi Camera.

As part of the test I got the pi to transmit the images to my desktop and the clarity was pretty good, there was a slight lag in the display of about 1/2 a second but at 1080p I don’t think I can complain. Below are some pics I took of the setup and of the image being streamed to my desktop.


The Camera module next to my keyboard for a size comparison


Photo of my hand being streamed live to my desktop from the Pi.

I do plan to take pics using the camera module itself, but there is nothing interesting on my desk that I wanted to take photos of so you will have to wait for a day or two and I will take pics of the view from my window and post.

Well this is all for now, I should go get some sleep now considering I have an early start tomorrow.

– Suramya

March 8, 2013

Citrix on Raspberry Pi: Updated instructions and working download image

Filed under: Knowledgebase,Linux/Unix Related,Techie Stuff,Tutorials — Suramya @ 2:36 PM

A couple of folks have reached out to me via email/messages to tell me that the instructions I posted at the Raspberry Pi forums don’t work with the latest version of Rhaspbian. Basically the problem is that the latest version of the Citrix client is not compiled for the armhf architecture (Which is what the latest version of Rhaspbian OS is compiled for), so you need to download and install the armel version of the OS (‘Soft-float Debian “wheezy”’) from http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads.

To make life simpler for people I have created a snapshot of my Pi install with Citrix installed and configured. You can download it from here. The image is 4GB so you will need to use a card of atleast that size when using this image. Follow these steps to install the image to an SD card in Linux:

  • Download the image file from the mirror (Approx 1GB compressed)
  • Unzip the file using the command
  • unzip Raspberry_Citrix.img.zip
  • Find out what the partition the SD card you are using has been assigned running the following command as root
  • fdisk -l

    Once you run the command, you will get an output that will show you all the disks attached to your system, look for the entry that corresponds to your card. In my case it looked like this:

     Disk /dev/sde: 3965 MB, 3965190144 bytes
    122 heads, 62 sectors/track, 1023 cylinders, total 7744512 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00016187
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sde1            8192      122879       57344    c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)
    /dev/sde2          122880     7744511     3810816   83  Linux
    
  • So now we know that the card is at /dev/sde. All we have to do is write the image to the card and that is done using the following command. Make sure you replace the /dev/sde with the correct path otherwise you will end up destroying all data on the wrong drive.
  • dd if=Raspberry_Citrix.img of=/dev/sde bs=4096

    You will not see any output on the screen so don’t worry about it, just let it run and wait for the process to complete as it will take some time because of the amount of data being written. Once the process completes you can eject the card and if all went well you should be able to boot the Raspberry Pi from the card.

The login password for this image is root/password, please do change the password if you use the image. Let me know if you have any questions or have an issue using this image.

Update (3/28/2013): Adding instructions on how to write the image when using windows. (Please note that I haven’t tested the windows instructions as I don’t have a windows machine. Use at your own risk)

Once you download the zip file from the mirror, right-click on it and select extract (I think that’s what it says, but I don’t have a windows machine so can’t confirm). After the image is extracted you will have a file called Raspberry_citrix.img on your computer. Now follow these steps to write the image to an SD card (Instructions taken from eLinux)

  • Insert the SD card into your SD card reader and check what drive letter it was assigned. You can easily see the drive letter (for example G:) by looking in the left column of Windows Explorer. If the card is not new, you should format it and make sure there is only one partition (FAT32 is a good choice); otherwise Win32DiskImager can make corrupt your SD card!
  • Download the Win32DiskImager utility. The download links are on the right hand side of the page, you want the binary zip.
  • Extract the executable from the zip file and run the Win32DiskImager utility. You should run the utility as Administrator!
  • Select the Raspberry_citrix.img image file you extracted earlier
  • Select the drive letter of the SD card in the device box. Be careful to select the correct drive; if you get the wrong one you can destroy your data on the computer’s hard disk!
  • Click Write and wait for the write to complete.
  • Exit the imager and eject the SD card.

You should also go through the Basic setup guide for Raspberry Pi. Hope this helps.

– Suramya

August 4, 2012

Reinstalled system after accidental removal of KDE. Pleasantly surprised by ease of configuration

Filed under: Computer Tips,Knowledgebase,Linux/Unix Related,Techie Stuff — Suramya @ 11:19 PM

Last night I was trying out stuff on my computer and decided to install virtual box on the system to allow me to install Windows in a virtual environment. I ran the command to install virtual box and then said ok without paying too much attention to what it was doing. As a punishment for that, the apt-get program proceeded to uninstall most of the KDE environment on the system leaving me with Gnome as my primary desktop (and there is no way I am using Gnome as my primary desktop). I could have fixed it by reinstalling KDE but since I had been thinking about removing the 32 bit Debian and installing the 64 bit version I decided to use this opportunity to do so and downloaded the 64 bit version from the Debian site, put it on a USB drive and proceeded with the install which took about an hour to complete.

After the install completed, I upgraded the system to the latest ‘Unstable’ build (Debian Unstable has the latest software packages so I prefer using it as opposed to Stable which is rock solid but has fairly dated software versions.) which took most of the night thanks to the no of packages to download and install. Once everything was upgraded I started customizing my setup and initially was dreading the amount of time it would take to get both my monitors working (based on previous experience) but surprisingly this time I didn’t have to do a lot to get both the monitor’s working.

If you remember, the last time I tried enabling the second monitor I hit a lot of hurdles mostly thanks to the mess I had made with my previous meddling and experimentation but this time it was fairly simple. I thought that I would follow the same steps I had the last time I installed the monitor so I started by installing the fglrx driver but the latest version of the driver no longer supports my chipset (ATI RS880 [Radeon HD 4250]) and the installer told me to install the free Radeon driver in the package xserver-xorg-video-radeon instead. So I did that after purging the fglrx driver (See here for instructions). I also had to install the Firmware for the Radeon card which I did by issuing the following command:

apt-get install firmware-linux-nonfree

After the driver was installed I rebooted (to make sure all systems started up clean) and setup my dual monitors by following these steps:

  • Click on Start -> System Settings
  • Click on ‘Display and Monitor’ under Hardware.
  • Under ‘Size & Orientation’ change the ‘Position’ dropdown to ‘Left Of’ the first (If your second monitor is to the left of the first one)
  • Set the Primary output to the monitor where you want the Task bar etc to show up. If you don’t know which monitor is which, click on the identify Outputs button.
  • Once you are done, Click on ‘Apply’ and if all looks good you can set it as default by clicking on the ‘Save as Default button’.

If you are ok with the resolutions available to you in the dropdowns above then you are done and you can skip the steps below.

Unfortunately for me I wanted a resolution of 1440×900 as the default instead of 1600×900 which was too small & the fonts looked pretty bad at that resolution and the 1280×1024 which was the next available size looked worse because my of my monitor shape (16:9 resolution as opposed to 4:3). So I had to do a bit more work to fix the problem.

First I tried manually setting the mode to 1440×900 using xrandr but I got an error message that “xrandr ‘cannot find mode'”. So I did a little Google search and found a forum post where another person was having the same issue. That link told me how to add a custom mode to my system which I did using the following steps:

First we need to figure out if our configuration will support the mode we are trying to use and if so get the modeline we need for the new config, so we run this command:

cvt 1440 900

If the system can support the resolution specified (1440×900 in the above example) it will return a line that looks something like:

# 1440x900 59.89 Hz (CVT 1.30MA) hsync: 55.93 kHz; pclk: 106.50 MHz
Modeline "1440x900_60.00"  106.50  1440 1528 1672 1904  900 903 909 934 -hsync +vsync

Luckily for us my system can support the resolution so we then need to tell xrandr about the new mode using the following command:

xrandr --newmode "1440x900"  106.50  1440 1528 1672 1904  900 903 909 934 -hsync +vsync 

Where the first paramter (“1440×900” in this case) is an identifier and the rest is the information returned by cvt. (If successful the command will return no output.)

Then we need to tell the system that both the displays (called DVI-0 and VGA-0 on my system) should use the new mode which is accomplished using the following commands:

xrandr --addmode VGA-0  "1440x900"
xrandr --output VGA-0 --mode 1440x900
xrandr --addmode DVI-0  "1440x900"
xrandr --output DVI-0 --mode 1440x900

If the commands were successful then your screen should resize and start using the new resolution. Now that this is done we want this to happen everytime we log in without having to run the commands manually.

When you click on the ‘Save as Default’ button in the ‘Size & Orientation’ dialog box, KDE saves your settings in a file at the following location: ~/.kde/share/config/krandrrc that is executed everytime you log in to KDE. So to make the changes permanent we have to modify the file with the new settings.

The file contains the following lines right at the top:

[Display]
ApplyOnStartup=true
StartupCommands= 

We need to modify the StartupCommands= line to use our new settings. Basically it should contain all the commands we used above in a single line delimited by \n. On my system the file looks like the following after I updated it:

[Display]
ApplyOnStartup=true
StartupCommands=xrandr --newmode "1440x900"  106.50  1440 1528 1672 1904  900 903 909 934 -hsync +vsync\nxrandr --addmode DVI-0  "1440x900"\nxrandr --addmode VGA-0
  "1440x900"\nxrandr --output VGA-0 --pos 1450x0 --mode 1440x900 --refresh 59.9782\nxrandr --output DVI-0 --pos 0x0 --mode 1440x900 --refresh 59.9782\nxrandr 
--output DVI-0 --primary

Once you make the change, save the file and log out. After loging out I usually restart X to make sure everything came up cleanly and then if all went well then the changes should take effect after you log in.

Hope others find this useful when configuring their systems.

– Suramya

PS: The best part is that after re-formating and using the Opensource version of the display driver instead of the proprietary one, my average memory usage went down from about 3GB about 1GB with all the same programs running in the background. 🙂

July 10, 2012

Wireless finally working on the RaspberryPi

I finally managed to get wireless working on the RaspberryPi (Go Me!). The main problem was that when I connected the USB dongle directly to the Pi it wasn’t getting enough power, then when I connected it via a powered USB hub I kept getting error messages. If you like you can read about me previous attempts to get the wireless working here and here. Since I didn’t feel like spending more time on this (and because I thought that the problem was caused because of a problem with the USB hub) I stopped fiddling with it. Then I had to switch the SD card I was using in the Pi (the old one was the card from my camera so I replaced it with another 2GB card) so I downloaded and installed Debian Wheezy on it.

Turns out that the Wheezy doesn’t have the same problems with the USB hub as Squeeze did, so all I had to do was plug in the stuff, install the firmware and I was ready to go. To configure the wireless network I installed wicd as I have found that to be the easiest way to work with wireless networks, I also installed the wicd-curses interface so that I could configure the system from the commandline. The commands I used were as follows:

apt-get install wicd wicd-curses

Then ran wicd-curses to configure the Wifi, That’s it. Now my Pi is connected to net wirelessly and I have one less cable running across my desk, which is great.

Well this is all for now. Will post more later, its time for me to hit the sack. Have an early day tomorrow.

– Suramya

June 27, 2012

Installing Citrix on the RaspberryPi + Other Pi related stuff

One of the use cases I had for the Pi was to use it as a portable thin client that could connect to a Windows server using Citrix. After a little experimentation I managed to get Citrix installed on the Pi and was able to connect to a Windows server successfully and work. I documented the steps I followed to get this to work on the RaspberryPi forum, check out the Tutorial (How to get Citrix working on a RaspberryPi) if you are interested.

Getting Citrix working was a positive thing, other than that I spent some time trying to install my Wireless network dongle (3Com OfficeConnect Wireless. Model # 3CRUSB10075) on the Pi and hit some hurdles in the process. If you remember the last time when I tried this I thought the problem was caused because the card was pulling more power than the Pi could provide. So I went and got a Belkin powered USB hub (I needed it anyways as I need to connect more than 2 USB devices to the Pi).

When I initially plugged in the hub everything seemed to work without issues and the keyboard + mouse I had connected to the hub worked without issues. So I plugged in the wireless dongle, as soon as I plugged it in my mouse and keyboard both stopped working. I then unplugged the dongle and both the mouse & keyboard started working again. I then plugged the keyboard directly on the Pi and the dongle on the hub, now the keyboard worked but the mouse had issues. Looking at the /var/messages log I saw a ton of error messages like the following:

Jun 21 18:10:46 raspberrypi kernel: DEBUG:handle_hc_chhltd_intr_dma:: XactErr without NYET/NAK/ACK
Jun 21 18:10:46 raspberrypi kernel:
Jun 21 18:10:46 raspberrypi kernel: DEBUG:handle_hc_chhltd_intr_dma:: XactErr without NYET/NAK/ACK
Jun 21 18:10:46 raspberrypi kernel:
Jun 21 18:10:46 raspberrypi kernel: DEBUG:handle_hc_chhltd_intr_dma:: XactErr without NYET/NAK/ACK
Jun 21 18:10:46 raspberrypi kernel:
Jun 21 18:10:46 raspberrypi kernel: DEBUG:handle_hc_chhltd_intr_dma:: XactErr without NYET/NAK/ACK

Tried a few things but nothing worked and since it was 3:30 in the morning I gave up and crashed for the day. Will try again when I have had some sleep and get some dedicated time to play with the Pi.

– Suramya

March 3, 2012

Configuring Dual monitors in Debian

Filed under: Knowledgebase,Linux/Unix Related,Techie Stuff,Tutorials — Suramya @ 12:01 AM

[Update 8th Aug 2012: This is an older method of setting up the monitor kept for historic reasons. In the newer version of KDE the process is a lot simpler, please refer to this post for the updated steps – Suramya.

Recently I went ahead and bought two new Dell 20″ monitors for my home system as I had gotten used to working with two monitors at work and wanted the same experience at home as well. The problem started because initially I tried installing another graphics card and hooking up the second monitor to that card using VGA. For some reason maybe because I was to tired and wasn’t thinking clearly, I couldn’t get both the cards to work at the same time. I would get one or the other but not both. To make things even more fun, the monitors are 16:9 aspect ratio and when I used the Opensource driver the only resolution with that aspect ratio I would get was 1600×900 which was too small and the fonts looked kind of jagged at that resolution.

Since I was going to be out of town and was planning on switching to DVI cables anyways I left the system like that (after spending a bit of time experimenting) and left. Once I got back I ordered DVI cables and finally managed to get the dual monitor setup working after spending about an hour one the issue. Below is the sequence I followed to get stuff to work (documenting this so that if I ever have to do this again I have a record of what I did):

  • Removed the second video card to reduce complexity. Might add it back later if required, or if I want to hook my old monitor as a third display.
  • Connected both monitors to the onboard ATI Radeon HD 4250 card, one over DVI and the second using VGA
  • Removed the Proprietary ATI and nVidia drivers (both installed in my previous attempts to get this working). Instructions here
  • Restarted X
  • Installed Catalyst (a.k.a fglrx) a proprietary “blob” (closed source binary) driver, using the following command:
  • apt-get install fglrx-atieventsd fglrx-control  fglrx-driver fglrx-glx fglrx-modules-dkms glx-alternative-fglrx libfglrx libgl1-fglrx-glx libxvbaw

Once the driver was installed I restarted X once again and got both monitors working, but the second monitor’s display was a clone of the first one which is not what I wanted so I had to do some more digging and finally managed to fix that using the following steps:

  • Open a terminal/Command Prompt
  • Disable access control so that clients can connect from any host by issuing the following command as a regular user
  • xhost +

    This is required so that we can start a GUI command from a root shell. If we don’t do this you will get an error similar to the following in the next step:

    No protocol specified
    No protocol specified
    amdcccle: cannot connect to X server :0
  • Run ‘Ati Catalyst Control Center’ as root
  • sudo amdcccle
  • Click on ‘Display Manager’ and configure your monitors (Resolution, location etc)
  • Click on ‘Display Options’ -> ‘Xinerama’ and enable ‘Xinerama’
  • There is a bug in the display manager that prevents it from saving any changes if the xorg.conf file exists, to fix:

  • Run the following command as root:
  • mv /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf_original
  • Click ‘Apply’ in the Catalyst Control Center
  • Restart X

That’s it. Once I did all that, my dual monitor setup started working without issues. Well… mostly. For some reason my desktop effects have stopped working (Transparent/Translucent windows etc) but I am not going to worry about it for now. That’s a battle for another day, maybe over the weekend.

Please note, that setting up Dual monitors usually is not this complicated in Linux. When I hooked up my TV to this same system I didn’t have to make any changes to get it to work. In this case since I was fiddling around I had to fist fix the mess I made before I was able to get this to work properly.

For those of you who are interested, the final xorg.conf that the above steps created is listed below:

Section "ServerLayout"
        Identifier     "amdcccle Layout"
        Screen      0  "amdcccle-Screen[1]-0" 0 0
        Screen         "amdcccle-Screen[1]-1" 1440 0
EndSection

Section "ServerFlags"
        Option      "Xinerama" "on"
EndSection

Section "Monitor"
        Identifier   "0-CRT1"
        Option      "VendorName" "ATI Proprietary Driver"
        Option      "ModelName" "Generic Autodetecting Monitor"
        Option      "DPMS" "true"
        Option      "PreferredMode" "1440x900"
        Option      "TargetRefresh" "60"
        Option      "Position" "0 0"
        Option      "Rotate" "normal"
        Option      "Disable" "false"
EndSection

Section "Monitor"
        Identifier   "0-DFP1"
        Option      "VendorName" "ATI Proprietary Driver"
        Option      "ModelName" "Generic Autodetecting Monitor"
        Option      "DPMS" "true"
        Option      "PreferredMode" "1440x900"
        Option      "TargetRefresh" "60"
        Option      "Position" "0 0"
        Option      "Rotate" "normal"
        Option      "Disable" "false"
EndSection

Section "Device"
        Identifier  "amdcccle-Device[1]-0"
        Driver      "fglrx"
        Option      "Monitor-DFP1" "0-DFP1"
        BusID       "PCI:1:5:0"
EndSection

Section "Device"
        Identifier  "amdcccle-Device[1]-1"
        Driver      "fglrx"
        Option      "Monitor-CRT1" "0-CRT1"
        BusID       "PCI:1:5:0"
        Screen      1
EndSection

Section "Screen"
        Identifier "amdcccle-Screen[1]-0"
        Device     "amdcccle-Device[1]-0"
        DefaultDepth     24
        SubSection "Display"
                Viewport   0 0
                Depth     24
        EndSubSection
EndSection

Section "Screen"
        Identifier "amdcccle-Screen[1]-1"
        Device     "amdcccle-Device[1]-1"
        DefaultDepth     24
        SubSection "Display"
                Viewport   0 0
                Depth     24
        EndSubSection
EndSection

Hope all this made sense and helps someone. If not feel free to ask questions.

– Suramya

February 13, 2012

Case of the missing translucent panels

Filed under: Knowledgebase,Linux/Unix Related — Suramya @ 11:39 PM

A couple of days ago I decided to try hooking up my LCD TV to my computer to see if I could use it as an extra monitor (that didn’t work that well because the TV was too big to be comfortable but that is a different story). So while I was connecting the TV over HDMI I also installed the proprietary drivers for my RADEON HD 4250 card (and promptly forgot about doing this).

Didn’t like working with the TV (too big, too close) so put it back and then noticed that my panel was no longer translucent and none of the desktop effects were working. Ignored it for a couple of days and then decided to fix the issue.

Tried disabling and enabling the Desktop effects from the Settings -> Desktop Effects but I kept getting and error stating that the effects could not be activated and that I should check my Xorg.conf for errors. Tried searching for the Xorg.conf file but that file doesn’t exist on my system so was stumped.

Ignored the issue for another day or so but then got irritated enough today to try and fix it again. Searched online for a fix and found some tips, some bug reports but nothing that worked. Then I found a page where this person was asking if the Opensource driver is better than the propitiatory one. This tickled my brain cells and I had a hazy memory of installing the other version, so decided to take a chance and uninstall the propitiatory version and re-install the Opensource version.

Used the following commands to do this:

  apt-get remove --purge fglrx*
  apt-get remove --purge xserver-xorg-video-ati xserver-xorg-video-radeon 
  apt-get install xserver-xorg-video-ati
  apt-get install --reinstall libgl1-mesa-glx libgl1-mesa-dri xserver-xorg-core
  dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg

After doing this I restarted my system (had to do it anyways) and got my desktop effects back. Yay me!

Thanks to wiki.Unbuntu.org for the steps to purge the propitiatory driver.

Hope someone else also finds this useful sometime.

-Suramya

January 28, 2012

Rooting the Samsung Galaxy Nexus

Filed under: Knowledgebase,Linux/Unix Related,Techie Stuff — Suramya @ 1:45 AM

A rooted android device gives you a lot of flexibility so one of the first things I did after I got back home was to root it using the following instructions (modified from Android Forums: [HOW TO] Root the GSM/HSPA+ Samsung Galaxy Nexus):

Note: I am assuming you are using Linux in the instructions below. If not then visit the link above for steps in Windows.

  • Download the Android SDK from here to a folder on your PC.
  • Power down your device
  • Connect the USB cable between the phone and your PC
  • Open a shell session
  • Switch to the directory where you downloaded the SDK (In my case it was Media/Downloads)
  • cd Media/Downloads
  • Extract the SDK Zip and switch to the new directory
  • unzip sdk-tools.zip
    cd sdk-tools
  • Make the applications executable
  • chmod a+x fastboot-linux adb-linux
  • Now, Boot your phone into fastboot mode by pressing and holding the volume-up AND volume-down AND the power buttons UNTIL you see the little green Android laying on his back with door on his chest open
  • Verify that fastboot can “see” your device
  • ./fastboot-linux devices

    You should see something similar to this:

    0146B5030B02100E        fastboot

    If you don’t see anything, try running the command as root.

  • Next we start the unlock process for the bootloader by issuing the following command. Keep in mind that this will completely wipe out all data from the phone so make sure you backup before running the command.
  • ./fastboot-linux oem unlock

    Confirm that you want the bootloader to be unlocked by acknowledging the warning message on the phone. (Please note that this will void your warranty). Use your volume rocker/keys to select the confirmation and press the power button to actually confirm.

At this point you have an unlocked bootloader and now we will start the rooting process.

  • Download the su.zip flashable root package
  • I had to manually copy the su.zip to the Phone because for some reason I kept getting an ‘error: insufficient permissions for device’ when I tried copying the file using adb. I used FTP (as I have SwiFTP on the phone, but you can use any method that you are comfortable with)

  • Download the Clockwork Recovery for Galaxy Nexus (GSM) to the same folder as fastboot and adb
  • Soft boot the ClockworkMod custom recovery by issuing the following command. This method will not replace the currently installed recovery partition on your phone, so you can still receive updates from Google.
  • ./fastboot-linux boot recovery-clockwork-5.5.0.2-maguro.img

    Your phone should now boot into ClockworkMod custom recovery. The next few steps are done on the phone. You shold use the volume key / rocker to navigate and the power button to select an entry.

  • From the main ClockworkMod Recovery screen / menu, select ‘install zip from sdcard
  • Select ‘choose zip from sdcard
  • Select ‘su.zip’
  • Confirm that you want do this.
  • Select ‘*****Go Back*****
  • Select the ‘reboot system now

That’s it. 🙂 Once your phone finishes rebooting, you should now have root. If you hit issues, try reaching out to the folks in the Android Forums for help.

Hope this helps.

Update (14th Feb 2012): As you all know links/stuff tends to disappear over time on the internet so I have updated the post with links to my mirror of the software required to root the Nexus. Original links are still listed below.

Original Download links:

– Suramya

January 3, 2012

Working without Free diskspace in Linux

Filed under: Computer Tips,Linux/Unix Related — Suramya @ 5:52 AM

On linux machines you can fill your root partition to 100% utilization and the system would still continue to function giving you a chance to free up space without downtime, but on Windows machines the same is not possible and if you have managed to fill your C:\ to 100% then the system will go down (Know this for sure for Windows versions up to Vista, not sure about Win7) hard. This is something that has puzzled me a lot over the years but didn’t know how it worked, but now I finally have an explanation:

When you format a partition in Linux , 5% of the total space gets reserved for privileged processes, by default. This is done so that system processes continue to function correctly ,if the filesystem gets full. This is useful for your ‘root’ partition.

The really interesting part is that you can configure this to reduce the percentage of the reserved space using the tune2fs command. e.g. if you wanted to reduce the reserved space for /dev/sda1 to 1% of the total space then issue the following command as root:

tune2fs -m 1  /dev/sda1

Source: Flossstuff’s Blog

Enjoy.

– Suramya

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